David Dobson

Broker Associate

1. HOW DO I BEGIN THE PROCESS OF BUYING A HOME?

Start by thinking about your situation. Are you ready to buy a home? How much can you afford in a monthly mortgage payment (see Question 2 for help)? How much space do you need? What areas of town do you like? After you answer these questions, make a "To Do" list and start doing casual research. Its very important to get "pre-qualified" first. Doing this will enable you to know how much of a home you can afford and what your payments will be. Having a Lender you can trust is key. There are many out there and the costs of "shopping" lenders can sometimes be more confusing than finding a home. Ask us about who our preferred and trusted Loan Officers are.


2. HOW DOES THE LENDER DECIDE THE MAXIMUM LOAN AMOUNT THAT CAN AFFORD?

The lender considers your debt-to-income ratio, which is a comparison of your gross (pre-tax) income to housing and non-housing expenses. Non-housing expenses include such long-term debts as car or student loan payments, alimony, or child support. According to the FHA,monthly mortgage payments should be no more than 2921711305020f gross income, while the mortgage payment, combined with non-housing expenses, 4 should total no more than 410f income. The lender also considers cash available for down payment and closing costs, credit history, etc. when determining your maximum loan amount.


3. HOW DOES PURCHASING A HOME COMPARE WITH RENTING?

The two don't really compare at all. The one advantage of renting is being generally free of most maintenance responsibilities. But by renting, you lose the chance to build equity, take advantage of tax benefits, and protect yourself against rent increases. Also, you may not be free to decorate without permission and may be at the mercy of the landlord for housing.

Owning a home has many benefits. When you make a mortgage payment, you are building equity. And that's an investment. Owning a home also qualifies you for tax breaks that assist you in dealing with your new financial responsibilities- like insurance, real estate taxes, and upkeep- which can be substantial. But given the freedom, stability, and security of owning your own home, they are worth it.


4. HOW CAN I DETERMINE MY HOUSING NEEDS BEFORE I BEGIN THE SEARCH?

Your home should fit the way you live, with spaces and features that appeal to the whole family. Before you begin looking at homes, make a list of your priorities - things like location and size. Should the house be close to certain schools? your job? to public transportation? How large should the house be? What type of lot do you prefer? What kinds of amenities are you looking for? Establish a set of minimum requirements and a 'wish list." Minimum requirements are things that a house must have for you to consider it, while a "wish list" covers things that you'd like to have but aren't essential.


5. How do I find out about Schools?
- Please check out our Schools section from the menu at the top of the David Dobson Group web site.


6. WHAT TAX ISSUES SHOULD I TAKE INTO CONSIDERATION?

Keep in mind that your mortgage interest and real estate taxes will be deductible. Our Qualified Real Estate professional's can give you more details on other tax benefits and liabilities.The total amount of the previous year's property taxes is usually included in the listing information.


7. IS AN OLDER HOME A BETTER VALUE THAN A NEW ONE?

There isn't a definitive answer to this question. You should look at each home for its individual characteristics. Generally, older homes may be in more established neighborhoods, offer more ambiance, and have lower property tax rates. People who buy older homes, however, shouldn't mind maintaining their home and making some repairs. Newer homes tend to use more modern architecture and systems, are usually easier to maintain, and may be more energy-efficient. People who buy new homes often don't want to worry initially about upkeep and repairs.


8. WHAT SHOULD I LOOK FOR WHEN WALKING THROUGH A HOME?

In addition to comparing the home to your minimum requirement and wish lists, consider the following:
- Is there enough room for both the present and the future?
- Are there enough bedrooms and bathrooms?
- Is the house structurally sound?
- Do the mechanical systems and appliances work?
- Is the yard big enough?
- Do you like the floor plan?
- Will your furniture fit in the space? Is there enough storage space? (Bring a tape measure to better answer these questions.)
- Does anything need to repaired or replaced? Will the seller repair or replace the items?
- Imagine the house in good weather and bad, and in each season. Will you be happy with it year-round?

Take your time and think carefully about each house you see. Ask your Realtor to point out the pros and cons of each home from a professional standpoint.

9. WHAT DOES A HOME INSPECTOR DO, AND HOW DOES AN INSPECTION FIGURE IN THE PURCHASE OF A HOME? 

An inspector checks the safety of your potential new home. Home Inspectors focus especially on the structure, construction, and mechanical systems of the house and will make you aware of only repairs,that are needed. 

The Inspector does not evaluate whether or not you're getting good value for your money. Generally, an inspector checks (and gives prices for repairs on): the electrical system, plumbing and waste disposal, the water heater, insulation and Ventilation, the HVAC system, water source and quality, the potential presence of pests, the foundation, doors, windows, ceilings, walls, floors, and roof. Be sure to hire a home inspector that is qualified and experienced. 

10. HOW CAN I PROTECT MY FAMILY FROM LEAD IN THE HOME? 

If the house you're considering was built before 1978 and you have children under the age of seven, you will want to have an inspection for lead-based point. It's important to know that lead flakes from paint can be present in both the home and in the soil surrounding the house. The problem can be fixed temporarily by repairing damaged paint surfaces or planting grass over effected soil. Hiring a lead abatement contractor to remove paint chips and seal damaged areas will fix the problem permanently. 

11. DO I REALLY NEED HOMEOWNER'S INSURANCE? 

Yes. A paid homeowner's insurance policy (or a paid receipt for one) is required at closing, so arrangements will have to be made prior to that day. Plus, involving the insurance agent early in the home buying process can save you money. Insurance agents are a great resource for information on home safety and they can give tips on how to keep insurance premiums low. 


12. HOW DO I MAKE AN OFFER? 

Your Realtor will assist you in making an offer, which will include the following information: 
- Complete legal description of the property 
- Amount of earnest money 
- Down payment and financing details 
- Proposed move-in date 
- Price you are offering 
- Proposed closing date 
- Length of time the offer is valid 
- Details of the deal 

Remember that a sale commitment depends on negotiating a satisfactory contract with the seller, not just Making an offer. 

13. HOW DO I DETERMINE THE INITIAL OFFER? 

Be loyal to your Realtor. Make a point of asking him or her to keep your discussions and information confidential. Listen to Realtor's advice, but follow your own instincts on deciding a fair price. Calculating your offer should involve several factors: what homes sell for in the area, the home's condition, how long it's been on the market, financing terms, and the seller's situation. By the time you're ready to make an offer, you should have a good idea of what the home is worth and what you can afford. And, be prepared for give-and-take negotiation, which is very common when buying a home. The buyer and seller may often go back and forth until they can agree on a price. 


14. WHAT IS EARNEST MONEY? HOW MUCH SHOULD I SET ASIDE? 

Earnest money is money put down to demonstrate your seriousness about buying a home. It must be substantial enough to demonstrate good faith and is usually between 1-56166274f the purchase price (though the amount can vary with local customs and conditions). If your offer is accepted, the earnest money becomes part of your down payment or closing costs. If the offer is rejected, your money is returned to you. If you back out of a deal, you may forfeit the entire amount. 


15. WHAT ARE "HOME WARRANTIES", AND SHOULD I CONSIDER THEM? 

Home warranties offer you protection for a specific period of time (e.g., one year) against potentially costly problems, like unexpected repairs on appliances or home systems, which are not covered by homeowner's insurance. Warranties are becoming more popular because they offer protection during the time immediately following the purchase of a home, a time when many people find themselves cash-strapped. 


16. WHAT IS A CREDIT BUREAU SCORE AND HOW DO LENDERS USE THEM? 

A credit bureau score is a number, based upon your credit history, that represents the possibility that you will be unable to repay a loan. Lenders use it to determine your ability to qualify for a mortgage loan. The better the score, the better your chances are of getting a loan. Ask your lender for details. 
There are no easy ways to improve your credit score, but you can work to keep it acceptable by maintaining a good credit history. This means paying your bills on time and not overextending yourself by buying more than you can afford. 

17. WHAT IS RESPA? 

RESPA stands for Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act. It requires lenders to disclose information to potential customers throughout the mortgage process, By doing so, it protects borrowers from abuses by lending institutions. RESPA mandates that lenders fully inform borrowers about all closing costs, lender servicing and escrow account practices, and business relationships between closing service providers and other parties to the transaction. 


18. WHAT IS A GOOD FAITH ESTIMATE, AND HOW DOES IT HELP ME? 

It's an estimate that lists all fees paid before closing, all closing costs, and any escrow costs you will encounter when purchasing a home. The lender must supply it within three days of your application so that you can make accurate judgments when shopping for a loan. 


19. WHAT SHOULD I LOOK OUT FOR DURING THE FINAL WALK-THROUGH? 

This will likely be the first opportunity to examine the house without furniture, giving you a clear view of everything. Check the walls and ceilings carefully, as well as any work the seller agreed to do in response to the inspection. Any problems discovered previously that you find uncorrected should be brought up prior to closing. 


20. WHAT MAKES UP CLOSING COST? 

There may be closing cost customary or unique to a certain locality, but closing cost are usually made up of the following: 
- Attorney's or escrow fees (Yours and your lender's if applicable) 
- Property taxes (to cover tax period to date) 
- Interest (paid from date of closing to 30 days before first monthly payment) 
- Loan Origination fee (covers lenders administrative cost) 
- Recording fees 
- Survey fee 
- First premium of mortgage Insurance (if applicable) 
- Title Insurance (yours and lender's) 
- Loan discount points 
- First payment to escrow account for future real estate taxes and insurance 
- Paid receipt for homeowner's insurance policy (and fire and flood insurance if applicable) 
- Any documentation preparation fees 

21. WHAT CAN I EXPECT TO HAPPEN ON CLOSING DAY? 

The closing agent will list the money you owe the seller (remainder of down payment, prepaid taxes, etc.) and then the money the seller owes you (unpaid taxes and prepaid rent, if applicable). The seller will provide proofs of any inspection, warranties, etc. 

Once you're sure you understand all the documentation, you'll sign the mortgage, agreeing that if you don't make payments the lender is entitled to sell your property and apply the sale price against the amount you owe plus expenses. You'll also sign a mortgage note, promising to repay the loan. The seller will give you the title to the house in the form of a signed deed. 

You'll pay the lender's agent all closing costs and, in turn,he or she will provide you with a settlement statement of all the items for which you have paid. The deed and mortgage will then be recorded in the state Registry of Deeds, and you will be a homeowner. 


22. WHAT IS THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT? 

Also known as HUD, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development was established in 1965 to develop national policies and programs to address housing needs in the U.S. One of HUD's primary missions is to create a suitable living environment for all Americans by developing and improving the country's communities and enforcing fair housing laws 


23. HOW DOES HUD HELP HOMEBUYERS AND HOMEOWNERS? 

HUD helps people by administering a variety of programs that develop and support affordable housing. Specifically, HUD plays a large role in homeownership by making loans available for lower- and moderate-income families through its FHA mortgage insurance program and its HUD Homes program. HUD owns homes in many communities throughout the U.S. and offers them for sale at attractive prices and economical terms. HUD also seeks to protect consumers through education, Fair Housing Laws, and housing rehabilitation initiatives. 


24. WHAT IS THE FHA? 

Now an agency within HUD, the Federal Housing Administration was established in 1934 to advance opportunities for Americans to own homes. By providing private lenders with mortgage insurance, the FHA gives them the security they need to lend to first-time buyers who might not be able to qualify for conventional loans. The FHA has helped more than 26 million Americans buy a home. Ask your Loan Officer all the facts about FHA and the benefits of getting an FHA loan. 


25. WHAT IS PMI? 

PMI stands for Private Mortgage Insurance or Insurer. These are privately-owned companies that provide mortgage insurance. They offer both standard and special affordable programs for borrowers. These companies provide guidelines to lenders that detail the types of loans they will insure. Lenders use these guidelines to determine borrower eligibility. PMI's usually have stricter qualifying ratios and larger down payment requirements than the FHA, but their premiums are often lower and they insure loans that exceed the FHA limit. 


26. WHAT IS MORTGAGE INSURANCE? 

Mortgage insurance is a policy that protects lenders against some or most of the losses that result from defaults on home mortgages. It's required primarily for borrowers making a down payment of less than 20 Like home or auto insurance, mortgage insurance requires payment of a premium, is for protection against loss, and is used in the event of an emergency. If a borrower can't repay an insured mortgage loan as agreed, the lender may foreclose on the property and file a claim with the mortgage insurer for some or most of the total losses. 


27. I have more Questions? 

As part of working with David Dobson Group, any of our trained Realtors can provide you with answers to questions not listed here. Whether Title insurance or termite inspections we have a Oklahoma Real Estate Commission issued pamphlet called the "State of Oklahoma Uniform Contract Information Pamphlet" that you will get when you work with us.